‘Junebug: No Life Too Small’ Virtual Read-Aloud

Teachers, parents, and guardians of young children, we see you and we know you’ve been working overtime lately to make sure kids are learning and staying safe during the pandemic. That’s why we’d like to give you a much-deserved break and teach them for you! That’s right—TeachKind, PETA Kids, and some exciting guests have come together to create a virtual read-aloud lesson featuring Junebug: No Life Too Small, a compassionate children’s book about respecting and showing kindness to insects.

Here’s what to expect from this fun video lesson:

  • Author Nicole Daniels reads an excerpt from Junebug and answers questions about being an author.
  • Former music teacher Jonathan Horn plays and teaches students three original songs about being kind to bugs.
  • Jordyn Tacoronte from PETA Kids, our host, leads students in creating an insect rescue kit and a neat bug-themed craft using common art supplies and household items.

Below are a few things you may want to know ahead of time in order to get the most out of the video lesson.

  • You can purchase a copy of Junebug: No Life Too Small to read along with the video. Daniels will read only one excerpt, so students might like to read the rest of the book.
  • The three songs that Jonathan will be teaching are to the tune of other, familiar songs. You can teach students the lyrics ahead of time or have them handy to refer to during the video:
  • ‘Help, Help, Help a Bug’ Lyrics

    (To the tune of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat”)

    Help, help, help a bug
    Gently as can be
    They just want to live their life
    Just like you and me!

  • ‘If You’re Friendly and You Know It, Help a Bug’ Lyrics

    (To the tune of “If You’re Happy and You Know It”)

    If you’re friendly and you know it, help a bug (clap, clap)
    If you’re friendly and you know it, help a bug (clap, clap)
    If you’re friendly and you know it and you really want to show it
    If you’re friendly and you know it, help a bug (clap, clap)
    (Jonathan will cue students to clap their hands, stomp their feet, and snap their fingers during the song.)

  • ‘Daylight Come and the Crickets Go Home’ Lyrics

    (To the tune of “Day-O, The Banana Boat Song”)

    Day-o, day-o
    Daylight come and the crickets go home
    Day, me say day, me say day, me say day
    Me say day, me say day-o
    Daylight come and the crickets go home

    Chirp all night and they had their fun
    Daylight come and the crickets go home
    Hopping in the grass ’til the mornin’ come
    Daylight come and the crickets go home

    Come, mister firefly, we must go to sleep now.
    Daylight come and the crickets go home
    Come, mister firefly, we must go to sleep now.
    Daylight come and the crickets go home

    Six-footed insects and eight-footed spiders
    Daylight come and the crickets go home
    Six-footed insects and eight-footed spiders
    Daylight come and the crickets go home

    Day-o, day-o
    Daylight come and the crickets go home
    Day, me say day, me say day, me say day-o
    Daylight come and the crickets go home
    Daylight come and the crickets go home
    Daylight come and the crickets go home

Pumpkin spider on a purple flower

  • To create an insect rescue kit and to participate in the craft with us, each student will need the materials listed below. You can review the instructions ahead of time or have them handy to refer to while watching the video.
  • Insect Rescue Kit Materials List and Instructions

    Materials

    • A small cup
    • An index card (or some other sturdy, flat item)
    • A small object, such as a coin or a pencil eraser, to practice using the insect rescue kit

    Instructions

    • Imagine that your small object is an insect who has come indoors. Carefully place the cup over the “insect” on a flat surface, such as the floor or a table.
    • Gently slide the index card underneath the rim of the cup so that the “insect” is on top of the card.
    • Carefully lift the cup and the card together and carry the “insect” to an outdoor area, like your backyard.
    • Download and print TeachKind’s insect rescue poster and keep it handy around the house or display it in your classroom for when “unexpected guests” need to be escorted back outdoors—the step-by-step instructions make it easy.

  • Ladybug Craft Materials List and Instructions

    Materials

    • A coffee filter
    • Crayons
    • Construction paper
    • Child-safe scissors
    • Glue

    Instructions

    • Begin by flattening the coffee filter: Smooth your hands across it on a flat surface, like a tabletop.
    • Then, using a black or other dark-colored crayon, draw a semicircle at the edge of the coffee filter. From the bottom of the semicircle, draw a line down the center of the coffee filter. This creates the head and two wings of the ladybug.
    • Next, color the wings of your ladybug red. Draw two eyes on your ladybug’s head and color the head black, except for the eyes.
    • Using the scissors, cut out four small circles from a piece of black construction paper. They should be about the size of a quarter. Glue them to the ladybug’s wings.

take rapid action to help bugs

  • TeachKind’s printable insect rescue poster provides step-by-step instructions on carefully containing insects who have made their way indoors and escorting them back outside. Display it in your classroom or in your home and refer to it whenever a bug needs rescuing to encourage students to be kind to all.

TK Insect Rescue Poster

*****

This video lesson will teach students how easy it is to be kind to insects and why these tiny, fascinating animals deserve our respect. To reinforce what students learned in the video lesson or to prepare them for it, check out TeachKind’s lesson using the popular children’s book Hey, Little Ant:

Get PETA Updates

Stay up to date on the latest vegan trends and get breaking animal rights news delivered straight to your inbox!

By submitting this form, you are agreeing to our collection, storage, use, and disclosure of your personal info in accordance with our privacy policy as well as to receiving e-mails from us.

“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind