Victory! Johnson & Johnson Bans Water Tank Test, Thanks to PETA

Published by Katherine Sullivan.
< 1 min read

Huge news: After talks with PETA, pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson has committed to not conducting or funding the forced swim test, in which mice or other small animals are dropped into beakers of water and swim frantically to keep from drowning.

The company and one of its subsidiaries, Janssen, have published about using this cruel, useless test in recent years. This announcement signals an end to the suffering of animals in these misguided experiments.

Johnson & Johnson has done the right thing in pulling the plug on the forced swim test, which is not just bad science but also hideously cruel.

The company follows AbbVie in making this smart, kind decision. In December, AbbVie became the first pharmaceutical company to take a humane and public stand against the near-drowning of animals. It pledged not to conduct or fund the forced swim test after PETA introduced a shareholder resolution calling on the company to take this step. The company even states on its website that it “does not currently use or intend to use or fund animal forced swim tests.”

Tell Other Companies to Shape Up

Now, we’re calling on Bristol-Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly, and Pfizer to follow suit. Click below to join us:

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 Ingrid E. Newkirk

“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind

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