Maple-Miso Tempeh Cutlets

3.8 (6 reviews)
Vegan

Maple-Miso Tempeh Cutlets

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Ingredients

  • 2 8-oz. pkgs. tempeh
  • 1/4 cup low-sodium vegetable broth
  • 1/4 cup liquid aminos (or gluten-free tamari)
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 2 tsp. white soy miso (or chickpea miso)
  • 1 tsp. dried sage
  • 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste

Instructions

  • Chop each tempeh block in half horizontally, then chop each half diagonally so you have eight triangles.
  • Fill a large shallow saucepan with a couple of inches of water and fit with a steamer basket. Place the tempeh triangles in the steamer basket and cover with a lid. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Steam the tempeh for 15 to 20 minutes, flipping the triangles once halfway through. Remove the steamer basket from the pan (keep the tempeh in the basket) and set aside.
  • Dump the water from the saucepan. Combine the vegetable broth, liquid aminos, maple syrup, miso, sage, and thyme in the pan and stir to mix. Add the tempeh triangles and bring to a boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat to a low simmer. Let the tempeh simmer in the sauce for 10 to 12 minutes, flipping them once halfway through, until the sauce is absorbed and starts to caramelize. Remove from the heat and add salt and pepper. Serve immediately. Leftovers will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for 4 to 5 days.

Makes 4 servings

Recipe from But My Family Would Never Eat Vegan!: 125 Recipes to Win Everyone Over © Kristy Turner, 2016. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold. theexperimentpublishing.com

Rated 3.8/5 based on 6 reviews

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