The North Face’s Cruelty-Free ‘Spider’ Silk Nets ‘Innovator for Animals’ Award

PETA Recognizes New 'Moon Parka,' Retailer's Latest Breakthrough

For Immediate Release:
August 30, 2016

Contact:
Sophia Charchuk 202-483-7382

Alameda, Calif. – It’s strong, it’s elastic, and it’s entirely plant-based: It’s the vegan spider silk made by Spiber, now found in the shell of The North Face‘s Moon Parka. In recognition of this revolutionary new collaboration, The North Face will receive an Innovator for Animals Award from PETA, the company’s second in two years.

Approximately 1,400 spiders are used to produce just 1 ounce of silk. The synthetic cruelty-free “spider” silk from Spiber is developed from fermented yeast cells, sparing spiders the trauma of captivity and stress-induced cannibalism inherent in the production of spider silk and allowing them to use their protein fiber for its intended purpose—to make webs, catch prey, and protect their eggs.

“The North Face is at the cutting edge of technology that is functional, comfortable, eco-friendly, and far kinder than archaic animal-derived materials,” says PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman. “PETA is calling on all retailers to follow The North Face’s lead and invest in new products that offer superior protection against the elements without harming living beings.”

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to wear”—previously gave The North Face an Innovator for Animals Award for its Thermoball™ technology, which, unlike down, retains its insulating abilities even when wet. Thermoball™ also spares birds in the down industry pain and terror, as their feathers are ripped out while they’re still alive—a documented practice in China, the source of most of the world’s down.

PETA will send The North Face a framed certificate and a letter of congratulations. For more information, please visit PETA.org.

For Media: Contact PETA's
Media Response Team.

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“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind