Los Angeles Gets Olympic Games—and a Request for Silent Fireworks

PETA Proposes Dazzling Noiseless Fireworks Displays for 2028 Summer Games

For Immediate Release:
August 4, 2017

Contact:
Brooke Rossi 202-483-7382

Los Angeles – After hearing that the International Olympic Committee chose the City of Angels to host the 2028 Summer Olympic Games, PETA offered its congratulations to the chair of the Candidature Committee, along with a suggestion: Ensure that the L.A. Olympics are a win for noise-sensitive animals and humans alike by using only stunning silent fireworks in the festivities.

In a letter sent today, PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to abuse in any way”—points out that silent fireworks rely on rich color effects and visual choreography to offer a stress-free celebration for everyone. They create a jaw-dropping show without the war-like explosions of traditional fireworks that can upset some humans, including the elderly and veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Loud displays can also scare off nesting birds and cause dogs and cats to run for their lives, many arriving at animal shelters with bloody paws and broken bones. And in worst-case scenarios, they never make it home.

“The games are great fun, but loud fireworks aren’t a game or any fun at all for the panicked animals who suffer tremendously from the sounds,” says PETA President Ingrid Newkirk. “As Los Angeles goes for hosting gold, PETA is urging the city to make a splash in the sky by putting on the first Olympics with wonderful silent fireworks.”

For more information, please visit PETA.org.

PETA’s letter to Bid Chair Casey Wasserman follows.

August 4, 2017

Casey Wasserman

Committee Chair

LA 2024

Dear Mr. Wasserman,

I am writing on behalf of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and our more than 6.5 million members and supporters worldwide, including thousands across Los Angeles, to congratulate you and your team on bringing the Olympics to Los Angeles and to offer a small but important suggestion to make the 2028 Summer Games extra special: Put on the first major Olympics display that uses only fabulous silent fireworks—for the sake of wildlife, companion animals, people with post-traumatic stress disorder, and others—making it a show that everyone can enjoy and admire.

Rich in color effects and visual choreography, silent fireworks offer a stress-free celebration for noise-sensitive animals, children, veterans, and elderly people. To these individuals, standard fireworks sound like an all-out war—and they have devastating consequences. Animal shelters see an increase in the number of lost dogs and cats following loud fireworks displays. Often, dogs go missing because they panic and jump over fences or break free from chains. Some even jump through glass windows in order to get away from the terrifying sounds. Many animals arrive at shelters with bloody paws and broken bones. Some are never reunited with their families, and others are doomed to an even worse fate.

In addition to being frightening, fireworks produce plumes of smoke that are harmful to animals’ respiratory systems, and they contribute to “acoustic stress.” The California Coastal Commission ended the city of Gualala’s fireworks displays after a show caused nesting seabirds to flee from their nests and abandon their chicks. In 2011 alone, fireworks were responsible for the deaths of about 5,000 birds in Arkansas.

Such tragedies are not limited to other animals: Veterans and others suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder are also sensitive to and can be deeply disturbed by the noise of the explosives.

By using only silent fireworks in the 2028 Summer Games, you would make a strong statement about allowing all citizens to enjoy this Olympic celebration. We look forward to hearing from you.

Very truly yours,

Ingrid E. Newkirk

President

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 Ingrid E. Newkirk

“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind