Don’t Just Wear Green This St. Patrick’s Day—Eat Green With PETA’s Help

For Immediate Release:
March 11, 2021

Contact:
Megan Wiltsie 202-483-7382

Norfolk, Va. – St. Patrick’s Day calls for raising a glass at home rather than participating in crowded pub crawls this year—and PETA is sharing delicious vegan Irish recipes to whip up for the celebration, along with a list of animal-friendly beer. (That’s right, not all beer is vegan!)

People will want to stepdance after trying PETA’s cabbage salsa or Irish nachos piled high with (what else?) potatoes and cabbage as well as meatless crumbles and dollops of vegan sour cream. Traditional shepherd’s pie made with lentils and a dash of Gaelic—sorry, garlic—makes for a perfect main course, along with PETA’s vegan spin on corned beef. And since some stouts and other types of beer are made with milk and honey (and are sometimes clarified using fish bladders), there’s a list of vegan gat to wash it all down, including Brasserie Dieu du Ciel Gaelique Irish Cream Ale, California Cider Company Wexford Irish Cream Ale, and Diamond Bear Irish Red. Celebrants may dance a jig at the prospect of sipping an Irish coffee topped with dairy-free whipped cream. Sláinte!

The best way to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day is to go green—by going vegan! Meat production is a significant contributor to deforestation, habitat loss, and species extinction. Far lower quantities of crops and water are required to sustain a vegan diet, making the switch to vegan eating one of the easiest and most effective ways to reduce our impact on the environment.

“Finding a four-leaf clover isn’t easy, but finding delicious vegan versions of all your favorite foods is,” says PETA President Ingrid Newkirk. “From Irish whiskey cake to all things cabbage, these hearty vegan recipes from PETA will have everyone not just wearing green but also eating it.”

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to eat”—notes that vegan food should be everyone’s “new normal,” considering that the novel coronavirus originated in a live-animal market. Each person who eats vegan also saves nearly 200 animals every year from misery on farms and terrifying deaths in slaughterhouses, where they are hung upside down and bled to death while still conscious. For more information, please visit PETA.org or follow the group on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

 

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“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind