South Korea Is Latest Country to End Poisoning Tests on Beagles

Published by Danny Prater.
2 min read

Good news for gentle beagles suffering in laboratories: PETA’s efforts to end yearlong pesticide tests on dogs have paid off once again. The South Korean government took steps to review its pesticide-testing requirements after we provided it with scientific evidence in 2015 showing that these tests do little to protect humans. Our scientists also pointed to the growing list of countries—including the U.S., members of the European Union, and Canada—that have already eliminated this test after communications with PETA. As a result, South Korea issued revised pesticide data requirements that don’t include the test.

Now, beagles will no longer be forced to eat food laced with pesticides or breathe air containing pesticide fumes daily for a year before being killed and dissected. Each country that eliminates the test spares hundreds of dogs annually the toxic effects of pesticide exposure and death.

PETA scientists have identified the remaining countries that still require this test and are working with their regulatory agencies to end the practice. Our goal is to see all pesticide testing on animals become a thing of the past.

© iStock.com/raybon009

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 Ingrid E. Newkirk

“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind

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