Robo-Groundhog: Right Every Time

Published by PETA Staff.
< 1 min read

Last year, PETA issued a Groundhog Day challenge, and students at Pennsylvania’s Lafayette College responded to it by inventing a robot that can detect shadows.

We think that using a cyber shadow-detector is a great alternative to yanking a frightened groundhog out of a fake burrow every February and waving him around in front of a boisterous crowd as cameras flash in his eyes. Groundhogs avoid human contact and spend their days digging and burrowing. In February, they should be midway through their winter hibernation, not dodging the paparazzi.

Would you prefer an innovative engineering marvel or a terrified captive groundhog to mark the day?customer surveys

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 Ingrid E. Newkirk

“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind

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