Bulls Charge Indian Embassies, Call Bullsh*t

Published by Michelle Kretzer.

In 2014, the Indian Supreme Court ruled in favor of PETA India and the Animal Welfare Board of India and banned bullfights, bull races, and jallikattu (a bull-chasing spectacle). The court declared that the inherently cruel events violate India’s Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act of 1960. But special-interest groups have been fighting that ban, and now the court is again deliberating the issue.

So herds of PETA “bulls” have been gathering outside the Indian Embassies in the U.S., Canada, and England to tell officials to keep bulls protected.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.

Ottawa, Ontario

Ottawa, Ontario

London, England

London, England

Disturbing videos from these events show terrified bulls being chased, kicked, punched, jumped on, dragged to the ground, and stabbed. During races, they’re hit with nail-studded sticks and driven to exhaustion. In bullfights, they’re stabbed, and the fight doesn’t end until they are killed or manage to flee, invariably injured.

Jallikattu

“India must not roll back the clock and allow bulls to be tormented and killed just to amuse a screaming crowd,” says PETA U.S. President Ingrid Newkirk, who is also the founder of PETA India. “The whole world is watching and hoping that the government of India will do the right thing by keeping these dangerous and cruel spectacles illegal.”

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.

Ottawa, Ontario

Ottawa, Ontario

London, England

London, England

What You Can Do

Tell Indian officials to keep bulls protected from cruelty by keeping bullfights and similar events illegal.

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“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind