Use Self-Isolation Time to Help Animal Companions Amid COVID-19 Concerns

People around the world are self-isolating, practicing social distancing, and stocking up on enough supplies to last weeks, but animal companions also need provisions. Here are some ways to make sure they’re cared for during these uncertain times:

1. If you’re able to go out shopping, grab a few extra bags of dog food, tubs of litter, or cans of cat food (and don’t forget about small companion animals!). On your way home, drop off these much-needed items at your local food bank.

A siamese-colored rabbit sniffs produce that is in a tiny, rabbit-sized shipping cart

2. When purchasing companion animal food, never shop anywhere that sells live animals. Doing so means lining the pockets of companies—like Petco and PetSmart—that are responsible for tremendous, systemic suffering, including by taking animals out of their native homes, shipping them across continents, keeping them in substandard conditions, depriving them of basic necessities of life (including appropriate humidity and temperatures), selling them indiscriminately to people who have no idea how to care for them, and so much more.

companion animal supply stores that aren’t petsmart sellouts

3. Did you know that animal shelters all over the world have Amazon wish lists? PETA’s fieldworkers have one, and we’re still in the field helping dogs! Without leaving the comfort of your home, you can find your local open-admission shelter’s list and purchase items that it needs. Not only will you be providing homeless animals with necessities, with each new box of goodies unpacked at the shelter, you’ll also be giving hope to the humans who care for them. It’s a perfect way to feed two birds with one scone!

4. If you’re practicing self-isolation, why not make life at home a bit brighter by fostering a dog or cat? Countless people are now staying home 24/7—and the silver lining is that many of them now have the ability to foster a homeless animal. Consider contacting your local animal shelter to inquire about becoming a temporary foster while you’re homebound.

A close-up portrait of a brown dog with a white muzzle as he looks through a metal chain-link fence.

5. We’ve gathered PETA’s most urgent action alerts concerning animal companions around the globe:

Help dogs right now.

Help cats.

Help rabbits.

Help mice and rats.

And don’t forget about fish!

Finally, please share this page with your friends and family members holed up at home who would also love to help animal companions in need.

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 Ingrid E. Newkirk

“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind