Wool-Free Winter Gear on Its Way From PETA to Domestic Violence Shelter

Families at House of Ruth Will Receive Cozy Vegan Wool Hats and Gloves in Honor of Rescued Sheep Abused for Her Wool

For Immediate Release:
December 12, 2017

Contact:
Audrey Shircliff 202-483-7382

Baltimore – As part of a wool-free winter initiative and in honor of an animal who was herself a victim of violence, PETA is sending cozy cruelty-free hats and gloves to children and mothers staying at House of Ruth Maryland, a safe haven in Baltimore for survivors of intimate-partner violence. PETA is donating the gifts on behalf of Hope, a sheep used for her wool who was haggard and covered with cuts when the group rescued her from an Australian market.

“Every wool sweater, scarf, and coat is the product of suffering and violence, which PETA condemns in all cases,” says PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman. “We want everyone to have a safe and happy cruelty-free winter, and this donation of wool-free hats and gloves will hopefully bring some warmth and comfort to families at the shelter.”

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to wear”—notes that its recent eyewitness investigations of more than 30 shearing sheds in the U.S. and Australia revealed shearers punching, kicking, and stomping on sheep as well as hitting As part of a wool-free winter initiative and in honor of an animal who was herself a victim of violence, PETA is sending cozy cruelty-free hats and gloves to children and mothers staying at House of Ruth Maryland, a safe haven in Baltimore for survivors of intimate-partner violence. PETA is donating the gifts on behalf of Hope, a sheep used for her wool who was haggard and covered with cuts when the group rescued her from an Australian market. them in the face with electric clippers and standing on their heads, necks, and hind limbs. One shearer was seen beating a lamb in the head with a hammer. In the wool industry, shearers are often paid by volume, not by the hour, which encourages fast, violent work that can lead to gaping wounds on sheep’s bodies. The wounds are then stitched closed—without giving the animals any painkillers.

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