Statement From PETA re Suffering Elephants ‘Dancing’ at Circus Museum

For Immediate Release:
August 27, 2014

“When elephants sway back and forth, experts recognize that they’re almost certainly exhibiting symptoms of the captivity-induced mental illness called ‘zoochosis’—in other words, they’re suffering and trying to cope with captivity and chains, not dancing,” says PETA Foundation Deputy General Counsel Delcianna Winders. “Elephants in the circus are denied everything that is natural and important to them and are taught to perform tricks by being beaten—there is no other known way, which is one of the many reasons why PETA’s motto reads, in part, that ‘animals are not ours to use for entertainment.'”

PETA’s blog post on this issue includes video footage of these same elephants exhibiting this disturbing behavior without music, and you’re welcome to use this footage on your website. Please let me know if you’ll be able to include PETA’s statement in your coverage or if there is any further information that I can provide.

For Media: Contact PETA's
Media Response Team.

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 Ingrid E. Newkirk

“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind