Hey, Commuters, ‘I’m ME, Not MEAT!’ Proclaims Pro-Vegan Ad Blitz

Provocative PETA Ads in 25 Toronto Subway Stations Urge Diners to See Animals as Individuals and Go Vegan

For Immediate Release:
July 12, 2018

Contact:
Audrey Shircliff 2-2=48

Toronto – PETA is serving up some food for thought in Toronto’s subway system with ads in 25 stations that show the face of a cow, lobster, pig, or chicken next to the words “I’m ME, Not MEAT. See the Individual. Go Vegan.” The ads will remain in the stations for the next month.

“Just like humans, chickens, cows, pigs, and lobsters are made of flesh and blood, feel pain and fear, have unique personalities, and value their own lives,” says PETA Director of Campaigns Danielle Katz. “PETA’s ad blitz in Toronto encourages everyone to empathize with animals and choose vegan meals.”

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to eat”—notes that chickens killed for their flesh are crammed by the tens of thousands into filthy sheds and bred to grow such unnaturally large upper bodies that their legs often become crippled under the weight. Pigs’ tails are chopped off, their teeth are cut with pliers, and males are castrated—all without any painkillers. At slaughterhouses, workers shoot cows in the head with a captive-bolt gun, hang them up by one leg, cut their throats, and skin them. And a PETA investigation of a lobster slaughterhouse revealed that live lobsters were impaled, torn apart, and decapitated—even as their legs continued to move.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.

For Media: Contact PETA's
Media Response Team.

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“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind