General Growth Properties Nets PETA Award for Banning Animal Exhibits

Mega-Mall Owner Also Bans Cruel Sale of Sugar Gliders on All Properties

For Immediate Release:
September 3, 2015

Contact:
David Perle 202-483-7382

Chicago – General Growth Properties (GGP) will no longer allow animals exploited by circuses and other outfits to perform at its properties, and for its kind decision, the company is receiving a Compassionate Business Award from PETA. GGP—which owns more than 120 retail properties in the U.S.—also formally banned the sale of fragile and nocturnal sugar gliders after hearing from PETA that these sensitive animals are typically raised in cramped, filthy conditions at breeding facilities before they’re sold to unprepared customers who are unable to meet their complex needs.

“Audiences are turning away from businesses that still subject animals to the misery of confinement and forced performances,” says PETA Foundation Deputy Director Brittany Peet. “PETA is calling on other companies to follow in General Growth Properties’ footsteps by no longer hosting cruel circuses and other outfits that use and abuse animals.”

It’s standard practice in circuses to beat, shock, chain, and whip elephants, lions, bears, and other wild animals in order to intimidate them into performing confusing tricks. Circuses tear baby animals away from their mothers, lock animals up in cages and chains, and cart them from city to city in all weather extremes. GGP’s decision to drop animal exhibits—one of which was hosted on its properties just last year—will help spare more animals the misery of life under the big top.

GGP joins Simon Property Group and CBL & Associates Properties, Inc., in banning wild-animal exhibits. More than 1,300 retailers have banned the sale of sugar gliders.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.

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“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind