After Deer Hit and Set on Fire, PETA Offers Up to $5,000 Reward

Group Asks for Public's Help Nabbing Person(s) Who Left Injured Deer to Burn to Death

For Immediate Release:
March 22, 2017

Contact:
David Perle 202-483-7382

Fulton County, Ind. – Early on the morning of February 16, a passerby discovered a deer who had apparently been hit by a car and set on fire—while still alive—at the intersection of State Road 25 and County Road 400. The animal was still smoldering when authorities arrived at the scene and ended his misery. According to news reports, someone poured accelerant on the deer before lighting him on fire.

Law-enforcement officials have yet to make any arrests in connection with this case, so PETA is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the arrest and cruelty-to-animals conviction of the person or persons responsible for this crime.

“No animal should experience the agony and terror of being run over, set on fire, and left to burn to death slowly,” says PETA Senior Director Stephanie Bell. “PETA urges anyone with information about this case to come forward immediately.”

Based on the debris reportedly left at the scene, a blue or black General Motors model—possibly a 1992 to 2002 Camaro, Trans Am, or Firebird—is believed to have been involved.

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to abuse in any way”—urges anyone with information about this case to contact Fulton County Sheriff’s Department Crime Stoppers at 574-223-7867 or Indiana Conservation Officers’ “Turn in a Poacher Line” at 1-800-TIP-IDNR immediately.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.

For Media: Contact PETA's
Media Response Team.

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