City Urged to Ban Fourth of July Fireworks to Protect Wildlife, Companion Animals, and Veterans With PTSD

Upcoming Hearing on Fireworks Rules Prompts PETA Plea

For Immediate Release:
May 29, 2020

Contact:
Nicole Meyer 202-483-7382

Lakewood, Wash. – PETA points out that people who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder can experience fear and panic at the war-like booms and that after fireworks displays, animal shelters see a spike in the number of lost dogs, who sometimes jump fences and even break through glass doors in order to escape the terrifying noises. The blasts also cause wildlife to flee onto roads and into buildings or abandon their nests.

“To the most vulnerable among us, booming fireworks can sound like an all-out war,” says PETA President Ingrid Newkirk. “PETA is asking Mayor Anderson to protect everyone in Lakewood by banning fireworks every day of the year.”

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to abuse in any way” and which opposes speciesism, a human-supremacist worldview—encourages kind people to celebrate with silent fireworks, which are richer in colorful effects and visual choreography than conventional fireworks and provide all the fanfare and celebration without any of the frightening noise.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.

PETA’s letter to Anderson follows.

May 29, 2020

The Honorable Don Anderson

Mayor of Lakewood

Dear Mayor Anderson,

On behalf of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and our more than 6.5 million members and supporters worldwide, I’m writing with regard to the proposed amendment that would ban the discharge of fireworks on July 3 and 5. We strongly and most respectfully urge you to adopt the fireworks limitations contained in the ban proposal and to consider also banning fireworks on July 4 and New Year’s Eve in order to protect all of Lakewood’s residents.

Traditional fireworks bring with them devastating consequences. They sound like an all-out war not only to those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder but also to dogs, cats, and wildlife. Terrified dogs climb or dig their way out of fenced-in yards as they frantically try to escape the explosions, resulting in increased stray-animal intakes at shelters. Many animals arrive with bloody paws or broken bones, some are never reunited with their families, and others are doomed to a worse fate.

Fireworks produce plumes of smoke laden with particles that are harmful to the respiratory systems of humans and other animals. Birds caught in or near fireworks displays often choke on the toxic residue. The California Coastal Commission banned the city of Gualala’s display when, following a 2006 show, seabirds fled their nests, leaving their chicks vulnerable to predators. Most birds cannot see well in the dark, so this type of disruption can lead to injuries if they inadvertently crash into power lines, cars, buildings, trees, or each other. In one case, 5,000 birds died on a New Year’s Eve in Arkansas after a fireworks display caused them to take flight and crash into objects such as houses and cars.

Such tragedies are not limited to animals: Many humans have been injured in fireworks accidents, and the displays can exacerbate asthma and other respiratory problems. Veterans and others suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder are also sensitive to and can be deeply disturbed by the noise of the explosives and the smell of the gunpowder. And on average, 180 people go to emergency rooms daily with fireworks-related injuries for an entire month around July 4.

As the Fourth of July holiday fast approaches, we hope you’ll enact the proposed restrictions and consider extending them further by including a ban on igniting fireworks on Independence Day and December 31. Thank you for your time and consideration. We look forward to hearing from you.

Very truly yours,

Ingrid E. Newkirk

President

For Media: Contact PETA's
Media Response Team.

Contact

Get PETA Updates

Stay up to date on the latest vegan trends and get breaking animal rights news delivered straight to your inbox!

By submitting this form, you are agreeing to our collection, storage, use, and disclosure of your personal info in accordance with our privacy policy as well as to receiving e-mails from us.

 Ingrid E. Newkirk

“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind