World’s Largest Clothing Retailer Donates 31,000 Angora Items to Refugees

Published by Michelle Reynolds.
2 min read

When Inditex, the world’s largest clothing retailer, learned from PETA that live rabbits’ fur is torn from their skin on angora farms, it adopted a permanent ban on angora wool. Now, the retailer—whose brands include Zara, Pull&Bear, Massimo Dutti, and Bershka—is distributing its remaining stock of more than 30,000 brand-new angora-wool garments to refugee camps in Sulaimaniya and Diyala, Iraq.

PETA and Inditex distribute clothing at refugee campAhmad Mousa/Demotix

PETA and Inditex distribute clothing at refugee campAhmad Mousa/Demotix

PETA and Inditex distribute clothing at refugee campAhmad Mousa/Demotix

As revealed in PETA’s exposé, some rabbits used for angora scream in pain as their fur is torn out, while others are cut or sheared and invariably wounded by the sharp tools as they struggle desperately to escape. In addition, the angora-farming industry condemns these intelligent, social animals to years of isolation in small, filthy wire cages.

PETA and Inditex distribute clothing at refugee campAhmad Mousa/Demotix

PETA and Inditex distribute clothing at refugee campAhmad Mousa/Demotix

PETA and Inditex distribute clothing at refugee campAhmad Mousa/Demotix

Inditex is part of a growing list of more than 220 top brands and retailers—including H&M, Ann Inc., Bebe, French Connection, ASOS, Calvin Klein, Stella McCartney, and Tommy Hilfiger—that have permanently banned angora wool.

However, some brands, such as Free People (which is owned by Urban Outfitters), continue to sell angora.

Tell them to stop here.

Get PETA Updates

Stay up to date on the latest vegan trends and get breaking animal rights news delivered straight to your inbox!

By submitting this form, you’re acknowledging that you have read and agree to our privacy policy and agree to receive e-mails from us.

 Ingrid E. Newkirk

“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind

Close

Monkeys don’t belong in laboratory cages.

By submitting this form, you’re acknowledging that you have read and agree to our privacy policy and agree to receive e-mails from us.

Close

Monkeys don’t belong in laboratory cages.

By submitting this form, you’re acknowledging that you have read and agree to our privacy policy and agree to receive e-mails from us.