Victory! UC-Irvine Ends Cruel and Deadly Classroom Experiments

Published by PETA.
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rat

Many of you have been writing to and calling the University of California–Irvine to demand that it stop using animals in horrible classroom experiments, and your efforts have paid off. The university has just announced that it’s ending deadly procedures using rats and replacing them with sophisticated computer simulations.

In the cruel neuroscience experiments conducted at the university, undergrads were drilling holes into rats’ skulls, damaging their brains with chemicals, and forcing them to perform in behavioral experiments to assess the brain damage they inflicted. Then the rats were killed. Following a complaint filed by PETA that included suggestions for non-animal alternatives, as well as thousands of e-mails, letters, and phone calls from our supporters, UC–Irvine conducted a review of the experiment and decided that modern, effective non-animal methods will now be used instead of animals.

Because of this victory, as many as 200 rats will be saved from suffering each year.

This is great news, but animals are still suffering in other labs, so it’s no time to rest on our laurels.

Case in point: At Arizona State University (ASU), baby rats are killed in classroom experiments in which students remove the animals’ small intestines and uteruses. In other experiments, frogs’ brains are destroyed when pins are stuck through their skulls, and rabbits have holes cut into their chests and are injected with various drugs before being killed.

Please take a moment to contact ASU and urge the school to follow the example of UC–Irvine by putting an end to the use of animals in classroom laboratories once and for all.

Written by Jeff Mackey

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“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind