No Need for Redskins to Change Name, Says PETA

Published by Alisa Mullins.

PETA is no stranger to creating controversy by asking sports teams to change their exploitative mascots, but in this case, we’re offering to help a football franchise fend off criticism.

After the Washington Redskins came under renewed pressure to change the team’s name as a result of its racial implications, we leapt to the rescue with an ingenious—and healthy—solution.

Don’t change the legendary Redskins name. Just change the logo.

redskins

When you hear the word “redskin,” what do you immediately think of? Potatoes, of course! And who could be offended by a harmless redskin potato—except, maybe, for the Yukon Gold lobby (and if Alaska had a football team, rest assured that we’d be the first to suggest the Yukon Gold Diggers as a franchise name).

The redskin potato would be a noble mascot for a variety of reasons. Potatoes are also native Americans, having been cultivated in Peru for millennia. A tasty, versatile, animal- and environmentally friendly vegan staple, potatoes are now the most popular vegetable in the U.S. They are loaded with nutrients, including iron, potassium, vitamin C, fiber, and even protein, and red potatoes in particular are high in antioxidants. (Take that, Cheeseheads.)


Photo by Molly

By keeping the name and adopting a heart-healthy, appeeling logo, the Washington Redskins would set a powerful example on and off the field. And that’s no small potatoes.

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“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind