Look How Far These Guys Are Going to Help Chained Dogs

Published by PETA.

You say you care about lonely, neglected dogs who are chained up in all weather extremes 24 hours a day, 365 days a year? How far would you go to prove it? Seminole County resident and PETA member Bryan Wilson (right) and a friend went so far as to chain themselves up for eight hours in the blazing Florida heat to call attention to the plight of dogs who spend all day, every day fighting off flies, fleas, and hopelessness.

Bryan Wilson

 

“Dogs are very social animals,” Wilson told a reporter. “By [depriving] them of their human packs, they are essentially reduced from family members to lawn ornaments.”

Wilson, who helped draft a proposed law restricting chaining in his county, isn’t the only one going to bat for chained dogs. Deborah Linz and Paulette Dean, who are featured in the current issue of PETA’s quarterly magazine, Animal Times, were each successful in passing ordinances restricting chaining in Kanawha County, West Virginia, and Danville, Virginia, respectively. More than six states and 120 communities across the country have banned or restricted chaining.

Want to be a hero to dogs by working to pass an anti-chaining ordinance in your community? You’ll die happy! To get started, visit HelpingAnimals.com for information on lobbying for anti-chaining laws.

Written by Alisa Mullins

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“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind