How can non-animal tests show us the complex interactions of cells, tissues, and organs?

Different species of animals vary so enormously in their reactions to toxins and diseases and in their metabolism of drugs that studies with animals are not good indicators for people. For example, a dose of aspirin that is therapeutic in humans is poisonous to cats and has no effect on fever in horses; benzene causes leukemia in humans but not in mice; insulin produces birth defects in animals but not in humans, and so on. Today’s sophisticated “super” computers can actually predict the effect of substances on all the organs of the human body.

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“Almost all of us grew up eating meat, wearing leather, and going to circuses and zoos. We never considered the impact of these actions on the animals involved. For whatever reason, you are now asking the question: Why should animals have rights?” READ MORE

— Ingrid E. Newkirk, PETA President and co-author of Animalkind