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See the Ad That’s Sending Shoppers Scurrying to Their Cars

Written by Lindsay Pollard-Post | August 15, 2014

It happens every summer: While their guardians indulge in “retail therapy” or relax at the food court in air-conditioned comfort, dogs who are left in cars in mall parking lots swelter in the summer heat—and many don’t survive. Already this year, many dogs have suffered gruesome, painful deaths after being left in hot cars while their guardians shopped or ran errands.

That’s why we’re reminding shoppers at malls throughout California (and other places, including Phoenix, Arizona, and Las Vegas, Nevada) that parked cars are “Too Hot for Spot!” with our eye-catching ads.

Too Hot For Spot Poster At Outdoor Mall

Too Hot For Spot Ad Outside JCPenney's

It takes just a few minutes for a parked car to cook an animal alive: On a warm day, the temperature inside a parked car can reach more than 160 degrees—even with the windows cracked open. Dogs can develop heatstroke in just 15 minutes, resulting in brain damage or death.

Hopefully, our ads will save many lives by making shoppers think twice about leaving their pups to bake while they scout for sales. If you see a dog, cat, or child (or anyone else!) trapped inside a hot car, please take immediate action—it could be a matter of life or death.

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  • mummymouse says:

    You need these in Seattle. People assume because Seattle has a lot of rain, it doesn’t get hot. But it does. It can get up to 100 degrees in summer.

    I arrived at a local shopping mall last week when the temperature was around 90 degrees. There was a cavalier king charles spaniel in a black car, in full sunlight, with all the windows up. He didn’t look distressed so I assumed his owner was running a very quick errand. I went and had lunch with my husband, took my son on some store rides, did our grocery shopping and returned to the car 1.5 hrs later. That little dog was still there, panting and clawing at the window. I sat in my car, with my windows up, for 5 mins while I waited to see if the owner returned. After 5 mins my son and I were drenched in sweat and he was asking to get out so that he could cool down, so I can’t even imagine how hot it was in the little black car. I went and advised the mall security who were about to break the car window when the owner returned. She’d been having a leisurely lunch in an airconditioned restaurant. I gave her a piece of my mind. She said her dog is fine being left in the car and she’d be sure to give it a drink when she got home! I gave her another piece of my mind and she took off as fast as she could. So frustrating. I can only hope she doesn’t do it again, but I’m pretty sure she will.

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