Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

Victory for Wildlife

Written by PETA | October 26, 2010
 Gilles Gonthier/CC by 2.0

Back in June, appalled Tennessee residents alerted PETA to the fact that the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) was advising people to cruelly and illegally drown or starve trapped wildlife or to asphyxiate the animals using car exhaust. PETA pressured both TWRA Director Ed Carter and Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen to intervene. In response, TWRA agreed to PETA’s request to develop humane guidelines for handling wildlife and to train staff members to advise residents who call about trapped wildlife only to use methods that are approved by the American Veterinary Medical Association!

This is a major breakthrough for wild animals who might otherwise be killed in torturous ways because property owners choose not to coexist peacefully with them.

Written by Lindsay Pollard-Post

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  • Kelly says:

    I agree with Carla. Peta please follow up as TWRA recently shot and killed at least six beavers and all their babies at Gallatin Marina in TN. Not sure why they didn’t just relocate them somewhere else on the river?

  • Gala says:

    This is a great story. Even those animals that people think of as unimportant deserve a voice of reason. All life is precious and deserving of care.

  • Carla* says:

    Peta, make sure you follow up on this, I’m concerned they may just tell you that to make you go away. And since the word is out with people they may still continue doing the cruel way cause the TWRA said it’s okay.

  • Rev. Meg Schramm says:

    We have a lot of possums in our neighborhood. We trap them in a cat carrier, take them to Santiago Creek behind our complex, and release them.