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Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

Break Out the Bubbly: Greyhound Racing to End in Wisconsin

Written by PETA | November 19, 2009
puppydogweb / CC
greyhound

On July 4, we celebrated Independence Day for greyhounds in New Hampshire when the state’s two racetracks closed. Well, get ready to toast “New Life’s Eve” for many racing greyhounds: Wisconsin’s only dog-killing racing track, Dairyland Greyhound Park, will hold its last race on December 31.

Life in the fast lane is hard and cruel for racing greyhounds, who spend long hours in cramped kennels and sometimes suffer broken legs, heatstroke, and heart attacks. Once their racing days are over, many dogs are abandoned, starved, shot, or sold to laboratories. After such hard living, it’s no wonder that dogs who are rescued from racetracks have a tendency to turn into couch potatoes.

One more down, eight more to go

Written by Karin Bennett

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  • aras says:

    What else can we do wit grey hound then.. .if we are not having race tracks surely this breed ll come to extinction in maximum 3 years.our childrens ll see this breed only in internet.

  • Jenny says:

    I live in WI and have read that there are over 900 dogs that need adoption or they will be euthanized. PETA can you please get the word out. The information is just hiding in a blog right now these dogs need to be saved!!

  • Jade says:

    This may be a “victory” guys but it isn’t so much because of animal advocacy. It’s more due to the fact of the economy. Any place I’ve seen here that has a track horse and dog there’s maybe 50100 cars there if any. Prior to the past couple of years they’ve been even fuller. Now how to make this a victory a true one for you is to put pressure on the groups that are left by encouraging people positively to think of something other than racetracks. There should be none of the ads you like i.e. “Racetracks murder dogs” which will make people go to the tracks and decide for themselves or be ignored but instead “Spend your money wisely go to the movies” which is true. I’m saying now is the time to not celebrate a victory not when the economy could bounce back and the remaining tracks get business again. It’s only time to do so when there are no more tracks at all.

  • Erin says:

    Just as an FYI … this information is wrong Contact Joanne Kehoe Operations Director P 312.559.0887 If you are interested in adoption contact gpawisconsin.org The Joanne person is just a broker for the racetrack not affiliated with the dogs.

  • Rev. Meg Schramm says:

    In one of the James Herriot books I don’t remember which one the author describes his experience substituting for the regular veterinarian at a greyhound track on race night. His job was to screen each dog before races checking for doping illegal feeding injuries etc. and he describes the abusive reaction of the trainers every time he pulled a dog from the lineup. Mr. Herriot stated that at one point he feared for his own safety but for the welfare of the dogs he had to be honest in his disqualifications. This took place in the 1930′s but things have not changed much.

  • shannon says:

    lisa Greyhound rescue groups often screen the dogs they take in to determine if they’re safe around cats small dogs children etc. Many are “cattrainable.” That is they can be taught to leave the cat alone. Getting the cat to leave the Greyhound alone is another story.

  • shannon says:

    I urge everyone who reads this article to contact their local Greyhound rescue groups and look into giving one of these wonderful dogs a forever home. My husband and I have applied to adopt one and will do so in the coming year. All of these dogs deserve a better life and a loving family.

  • Kathleen Smith says:

    Lisa we have six cats two labradors and a st bernard that are all rescue. They all get on well together tho I appreciate labs arnt bred to chase small furries!!If you google dogsblog or dogsos you may be able to find a greyhound who isnt interested in chasing them. These sites are both dedicated to rescue dogs in the UK.Good luck!

  • lisa says:

    Thats fantastic news i wish the UK would follow suit if a greyhound is’nt up to scratch by the time they are 18 months old they are killed luckly we have organisations that try and rescue as many as they can they are beautiful gentle loving animals i would love to offer a loving home to one but as i have cats im not sure how they would all get on.

  • Mia says:

    I saw a man with his Greyhound at a cafe the other day and I just couldn’t believe how graceful and beautiful these dogs are! It’s absolutely ridiculous that these LOVELY creatures are used abused and thrown out the way they are. Way to go Peta! Please keep up the GREAT work. You guys help me breathe a little easier lol

  • Rad_Rosa89 says:

    YES VICTORY!!!!!!

  • jodie wineland says:

    Dairyland Greyhound Racetrack in Kenosha Wisconsin will be closing on December 31 2009. 900 Greyhounds need to be adopted or they will be euthanized. Please help me get the word out there is only 6 weeks to get this task done. Contact Joanne Kehoe Operations Director P 312.559.0887 Or Dairyland Race Track Adoption Center direct at 262 6128256

  • Brien Comerford says:

    Law enforcement must ensure that the “owners” of the greyhounds treat them humanely and find them hospitable homes.

  • Leah says:

    December?????? Too long to wait in my opinion! I like good things to happen fast.

  • Tania says:

    I think it’s wonderfulI think all dog tracks and horse tracks should be closed down permanentlythey just choose the animaluse it then lose it when it no longer turns a profit. If you think boxing is a corrupt sportyou should take a peek behind the scenes at these so called race tracks and horse farms.

  • fair for all says:

    I am a horse trainer and I have several other animals on my farm. I would just like to say that everything that you see is not necessarily as it appears. I do not believe in being cruel to animals but I believe that they are here for our enjoyment or food or work or whatever we choose to use them for. They are not capable of taking care of themselves therefor they depend on us and just as people have to work for what they want so do animals. I know that my horses love to be ridden and worked because they run to me as soon as they see me comming. Sometimes if they are misbehaving they have to be repremanded just like people do. This world is not a perfect place and some people make it bad for the rest of us but that is no reason to steriotype every situation. I eat beef and I raise my own. They have wonderful lives with an abundance of grass to eat and graze and they are fed the best grain and watered regularly. They are very tame and we do not abuse them but at the end of their lives they are killed in a humane way and they are served for dinner. It is survival of the fittest. If we did not control the herds the world would become overrun by animals. How do you justify this behavior???

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