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PETA Calls for Tough Prosecution of Alleged Teen Kitten Killer

Group’s Education Arm Rushes ‘Report Animal Abuse’ Posters to School District

For Immediate Release:
August 27, 2013

Contact:
Shakira Croce 202-483-7382

East Chicago, Ind. — Today, PETA sent an urgent plea to supervising prosecutor Kathleen Guzek urging her to vigorously prosecute the 17-year-old East Chicago teen who is facing charges of cruelty to animals for allegedly killing three kittens with a bow and arrow. The teen reportedly impaled the kittens through their heads and bodies with arrows, then posted photos of himself playing with and pretending to eat the kittens’ corpses on Facebook. The suspect apparently told police that he had “hunted” the kittens because he was “bored.” In its letter, PETA points out that criminal profile studies show that many people who are violent toward animals in their youth grow up to commit violent crimes against humans—making early enforcement action even more crucial.

The group’s educational division, TeachKind, has also rushed a package of “Abuse: Report It If You See It” posters to each of the schools in School City of East Chicago in the hope of preventing future similar incidents. The posters show a chained, cowering dog next to insulting phrases such as “Shut Up,” “Stupid,” and “Dumb Dog” and goes on to explain the link between animal abuse and violence directed toward humans, concluding with the words “Bullies Are Cowards—Don’t Be Afraid to Report Them.”

“People of any age who harm animals are a threat to society, and Lake County authorities must send a strong message to kids that there are consequences for hurting and killing animals,” says PETA Director Martin Mersereau. “PETA’s posters will remind kids of the need to go to their parents, their teachers, or the police to report cruelty to animals the moment it occurs—for everyone’s sake.” 

According to leading mental-health professionals and law-enforcement agencies, perpetrators of violent acts against animals are often repeat offenders who pose a serious threat to all animals, including humans. In fact, a study conducted by Northeastern University and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals found that people who abuse animals are five times more likely to commit violent crimes against humans.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.