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GoDaddy Asked to Replace Dog-Selling Ad With Jaw-Dropping PETA Spot

Written by PETA | January 28, 2015

GoDaddy may have pulled its widely condemned Super Bowl spot, but the damage—promoting the breeding of dogs and the selling of the puppies online—has already been done. That’s why today we sent the Web-hosting company a letter suggesting that it use one of PETA’s provocative pro-adoption ads during its Super Bowl spot.

PETA’s suggestions include “Buy One, Kill One” and “Everyday Dogs,” which use body bags to point out how, for every dog bought from a breeder or pet store, a dog in an animal shelter loses his or her chance at finding a home (and, often, loses his or her life). Another option is “The Talk,” which makes a satirical comparison to teen pregnancy to highlight the homeless-animal overpopulation crisis.

“GoDaddy missed the mark with its pro-breeder ad, but it can still make amends by warning Super Bowl viewers that breeders are killing shelter dogs’ chances,” says PETA President Ingrid E. Newkirk. “By using one of PETA’s cheeky pro-adoption ads for its Super Bowl spot, GoDaddy can get just as much attention while making a huge difference for the millions of lovable dogs who end up in animal shelters every year.”

Dogs sold in pet stores or online often come from puppy mills, where they are treated like nothing more than merchandise. Investigations of puppy mills have revealed that dogs are forced to live with little to no shelter from the elements, suffer from rampant diseases and untreated injuries, and even go insane from the intense confinement and deprivation. What’s more, every year, 6 to 8 million animals end up in animal shelters across the U.S., and about half of them are euthanized because there simply aren’t enough homes for them all. Countless more cats and dogs suffer on the streets, where they’re vulnerable to traffic, abuse from cruel people, attacks by other animals, disease, weather extremes, and starvation. Breeders and those who buy animals from them instead of adopting from a shelter are responsible for much of this suffering.

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