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Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

More on Breeders

Written by PETA | September 13, 2007

Responsible_breeder.jpg

My post on Breeders this week seems to have raised enough controversy that it merits a follow-up entry. I followed the comments on this one really closely, and it’s pretty clear that there’s some interesting stuff going on. PETA Files reader Kelly—who was the most outspoken representative of the forces of good in the comment war on that particular post—made this remark, which inspired me to get out my pipe and Sherlock Holmes hat and do a bit of investigative work:

“Would anyone like to know why the crackpot breeders have come out of the woodwork to come here and spread the usual propaganda about ‘reputable’ breeders? They are all madly messaging each other and emailing each other and exhorting each other on their forums to come here and spread the gospel and try to cover their butts.”

Sure enough, when I looked into it, the page was getting some heavy traffic from breeder-focused message boards and sites, and an unusual amount of comments with the standard anti-animal propaganda that people copy and paste from meat-industry front groups when they have an axe to grind about an initiative that’s designed to help animals. There was also the standard drivel about “responsible” breeders (as if such a thing existed). Which got me to thinking: What po$$ible rea$on could the$e breeder$ have for coming onto PETA’s blog by the dozen to try and di$courage people from adopting from a shelter? If anyone ha$ any idea$, I’d love to hear them. It’$ a total my$tery to me!

Anyway, by way of an answer to some of the legitimate questions about the campaign that appeared in the comments:

1) Sad as it is to see them there, buying an animal from a pet store just isn’t a good way to help them. If you pay for that animal, not only is she going to be replaced right away with another one, but you’re funding the pet store’s practice with your purchase, and denying an adoptable animal at a shelter a chance at life at the same time.

2) I deliberately didn’t draw a distinction between so-called “responsible” breeders and people who run puppy mills. Sure, some of these folks aren’t quite so cruel as the scumbags who torture animals in puppy mill-type operations, but the point here is that there is no excuse for breeding and selling animals when millions upon millions of them are being killed in shelters or suffering out on the streets.

That’s it on breeders for now, but keep an eye out for some of the great new stuff we have coming up to expose this vicious little industry for what it is.

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  • Marie says:

    Why do we have so many unwanted dogs and cats? It comes from Selfishness irresponsibility carelessnes on the part of a multitude of people. Why do so many attack and target breeders who carefully place the animals they sell who are responsible and truley love their animals? How about educating kids at home and in school at an early age by teaching them the importance of being a responsible pet owner. Teach kids what happens to all these unwanted animals because of irresponsible careless people. Lets do our best to get through to them at an early age. This could help. Pet shops and shelters could encourage prospective or new pet owners to watch videos on site or hand out materials that could help educate people about the consequences of irresponsible breeding and care of pets.

  • jael says:

    Not all breeders are created equal. And the bad breeders usually turn out to be BYBs or puppy farmers you should be condemning those bastards instead of tarring all breeders with the same brush. I have a German ShepherdLab bitch from the SPCA and a German Shepherd male from…dun DUN DUNNN!!! A reputable breeder. Both are great! Upon buying ‘my boy’ at the breeders I was interviewed and they observed how the dog reacted around me. I walked around the premises to see the dogs’ area they were happy running around on the farm! They were more than happy to answer questions about the German Shpeherd diet and care showed me his pedigree and medical history and we spent a good four hours talking about their dogs and the German Shepherd in general. Would a BYBpuppy farmer do that? NO! …plus goodexperienced breeders DO NOT inbreed their dogs and will breed a very small litter of pups each year. “Many buyers are either emabarrassed to admit that they don’t want the dog any more or want some of their money back and prefer to SELL rather than give back to the breeder and get no $$.” Bullshit. Like my son I enjoy taking my dogs out for car rides and walks in the park and would never give them up. If it came down to that then I would return it to the breeder. Why? At least I know their background.

  • pam says:

    Having worked in an animal shelter I can tell you first hand how many “purebred” animals from “reputable” breeders actually turn up at animal shelters when they are no longer cute little puppies. Almost half of the animals at the shelter where I worked were purebreds purchased from reputable breeders. When a puppy is purchased from a breeder the new owners forget that soon the puppy will grow up and become an adult dog. When that happens they’re no longer cute and end up neglected abused and unwanted. Myself I would eventually like to get a dog. When I am ready I will adopt and give a shelter dog a chance.

  • Anne says:

    ok the concept of breeding isn’t 100 wrong to me anyways but to breed dogs when there are millions dying is. And despite popular belief you can find puppies and purebreds at shelters you just aculty have to do research. I know the horror of that. if you really love dogs you’ll take the time to find the right one for you at a shelter.

  • Jessica says:

    Do not blame the breeders blame the people who put the dogs in the shelters in the first place!

  • Peter McEwen says:

    The cute blackspotted horseloving dalmation. The sweet energetic brave Cairn terrier remember Toto? The rugged wolflike malamute. The bignosed intelligent loyal collie Those good ole boysthe bloodhound and the bluetick coonhound. The German shepherd dog. The scaryintelligent border collie. The Poodle That clumsylooking hero of a dog the Saint Bernard. The golden retriever. The labrador retriever somebody find me a labrador and I’ll retrieve it!. The beagle. The Scotty. Nice aren’t they. Without breeders they wouldn’t exist. No to puppy mills Yes to responsible breeders. Yes to spaying and neutering. Yes to saving a life by getting a pet from a shelter. But also yes to having such a thing as breeds.

  • Soliel says:

    I have a comment about the religion issue. One poster here was commenting on how caring about dogs is not part of the JudeoChristian ethic. I disagree. True religion involves compassion mercy using our God given intelligence to solve problems and respect for all beings. Many Christians do not see it that way but it is the true way. To turn away from suffering due to religion is not being religious AT ALL it’s being heartless. Do you think your God is happy with you being heartless? I think not. About the abortion issue. I think we need to look at both issues. Killing is killing and we need to have respect for all beings and that includes the ones in the womb. It’s funny where I re considered this…from Buddhism! In one particular Buddhist book I read “if you have an abortion you will be aborted in another life”. It made me reconsider that all life matters…dogs other animals and unborn babies. But aside from that caring about animals does not preclude caring about humans. I often feel that argument is an excuse to not care at all.

  • sara finlayson says:

    After reading these comments about dog breeders I had to say something. My Grandmother is a dog breeder and has been for 20 years. From first hand experience I can tell you that not all breeders are evil and just in the business to make a quick buck. I have adopted from the shelters and they do NO background check on the individual making the adoption. My Grandmother has turned buyers aways and refused to sell them a puppy because she felt they were not responsible too young or doing it for the wrong reasons. Shelters do not do this! I hope that by increasing the amount of good breeders not only will it force breeder mills out of business but it will help weed out bad dog owners.

  • DAWN BECK says:

    YOU KNOW I’VE SUPPORTED PETA ON MANY THINGSBUT NOT ON THIS.YES THERE ARE MANY BREEDERS WHO ARE OUT FOR THE QUICK BUCKBREED THE DOGS AND SELL.BUT FOR EVERYONE OF THEM THERE IS THREE RESPONSIBLE BREEDERS WHO MAKE SURE THAT THEIR BABIES ARE GOING TO A GOOD HOME.HOMES THAT PROVIDE THEM WITH SHELTERFOODWATERCOMPANIONSHIPTRAINING AND LAST BUT NEVER LEAST LOVE.HOW DO I KNOW THIS BECAUSE I HAVE A PURE BREED CORGII WENT THROUGH THE RINGER TO AQUIRE HIM.ANSWERED MORE QUESTIONS ABOUT MY WORK LIFEPERSONAL LIFE AND HABITSTHEN I EVER THOUGHT POSSIBLE.THE PERSON A RECIEVED MY LITTLE GUY FROM HAS ALWAYS STAYED IN CONTACT WITH MEHAS BEEN PARTLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SUCCESS I HAVE HAD WITH HIS DEVELOPMENT.HE IS WITHOUT A DOUBT A HAPPYHEALTHY AND PLAYFUL THREE YEAR OLD. AS FOR THE FACT THAT THEIR CONTRACTS ARE USELESS THEN YOU’VE NEVER ADOPTED A DOG FROM A SHELTER BECAUSE GUESS WHAT YOU SIGN ALMOST THE EXACT SAME CONTRACTTHE ONLY DIFFERENCE IS THE SHELTER DOESN’T TRUST YOU ENOUGH TO GET THE DOGBITCH SPAYED OR NUETEREDSO THEY DO IT FOR YOU.HOW DO I KNOW THIS BECAUSE I ALSO HAVE WONDERFUL LITTLE BABIES THAT COME FROM SHELTERS.I ACTUALLY SUPPORT MY LOCAL NOKILL SHELTER.AND OUR LOCAL HUMAN SOCIETY AND THE SPCA.SO I GUESS THAT ALSO ANSWERS YOU GUYS CLAIM THAT BY HAVING A PURE BREED ANIMAL YOU KILL SHELTER ANIMALS.I ACTUALLY RIGHT NOW AT THIS TIME HAVE 1 PURE BRED DOG AND 4 RESCUE ANIMALSA DOGTWO CATS AND BELIEVE IT OR NOT A FISH.ACTUALLY REALLY GOOD BREEDERS ASLO RECOMMEND YOU TRY TO RECIEVE ANIMALS FROM SHELTERS AND RESCUE.MAYBE YOU SHOULD TRY MEETING A REALLY GOOD BREEDER AND TALKING TO THEM BEFORE CONDEMNING THEM ALL.

  • Kerry says:

    So let me get this straight.. What yopu folks are saying is that all breeding should be stopped and we just let all breeds of dogs disappear from the face of this earth? Hmmm..sounds like you folks are some sort of Gods..

  • Kelley says:

    FrancesI am so sorry to hear about your experience with FIPI lost my beloved cat Yoda to it several weeks ago. I adopted her from our local HS when she was 9 months and she died at 2 years. It was just awful but I would do it again in a minute. She was happy and loved. FIP is a problem in the entire cat populationboth in shelters and in catteries. The disease does not make any distiction between purebreds and mixed breed alley cats. FIP can wipe out an established breeding operation so don’t assume specially bred cats are automatically healthy. There is no reliable test for this mutation on the market. I did wait a while before falling in love with Noor my new kitten also a shelter baby.

  • kelly says:

    Many buyers are either emabarrassed to admit that they don’t want the dog any more or want some of their money back and prefer to SELL rather than give back to the breeder and get no $$. Many would rather give away to relatives and friends. And many of Lilu’s breeder comrades don’t have the space to take back or refuse to as another poster noted.

  • kelly says:

    Lilu many in shelters and rescues have placed your dogs and those of other “reputable” breeders. You didn’t even know the buyers dumped the dog!

  • Lilu says:

    Yet again. Responsible breeders will never have a puppy in the pound. We microchip our dogswe KNOW where they are. If they ever do make it into a shelter we’ll drive crosscountry to get them and then blacklist the former owners in the show circles. The people you want are these maniac ‘I bred a labrador and a poodle so I’m gonna say it’s a Labradoodle! and sell it for $1000!’. Not those of us actually devoted to our dogs. As for those of you who think we actually don’t give a care about our animals? Think what you want. Obviously I can’t change your mind. But I know if anything ever happened to my dogs due to breeding or otherwise I’d be heartbroken. They’re family firstjust like with all of us. And they’re never a source of income… except to the vet.

  • Alan says:

    Thanks for such an intelligent repost Judith the Freedom Fighter. You have converted me ……

  • Susannah S says:

    I don’t think these statements are absolutes all breeders are only in it for money. to buy a dog from a breeder means that a shelter dog dies. These statements ARE absolutes however there are thousands and thousands of healthy loving animals killed every year in shelters just because no one wants them. there are also thousands and thousands of unneutered animals wandering around making that problem worse by the minute. there ARE many breeders who irresonsibly breed dogs with health problems and emotional problems and those puppies often end up in shelters. There are also breeders who specialize in new “designer breeds” just to indulge some stupid whim of fad or fashion and some of the results are devastating for the dogs. there ARE breeders who are just in it for the money too and there are some very irresponsible shelters whose policies result in illness and injury to the dogs. There are shelters that don’t have enough money to care for the amount of animals that they house and the “nokill” policy often simply means that an animal will be turned away because there’s no room. Those dogs are NOT necessarily finding homes any better than the regular shelters’ dogs which means that while they’re not killed they can live out their lives in a cage or a small run and never have a home. The problem with taking an absolute point of view is that there ARE no absolutes when it comes to the problem of unwanted animals in this country. For every solution there is a concomitant problem but for every problem there ISN’T always an easy solution. Anyone involved in rescue and shelters could attest to that. One of the ways to truly HELP is to actively promote and work towards spaying and neutering all dogs. To say that this would eventually result in NO dogs is like saying that if everyone stopped eating meat there would be no cows or chickens. That may be so ultimately but we are no where NEAR that ultimate and until it becomes an issue it’s a stupid argument frankly. What we ARE dealing with right now is the needless suffering of animals and in great quantities and one of the ways to help as far as cats and dogs are concerned is to spay and neuter them. There ARE no easy answers. There ARE no oneshot solutions. But one solution that IS obvious is that dogs and cats should be neutered untilunless there gets to be a shortage of dogs and cats in which case the whole issue will be reconsidered anyway.

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