Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

L’OrEal used to be included on the cruelty-free list. Now I see that it is included on the “do test” list. What happened?

PETA actively campaigned against L’Oréal for some time because of its use of animals in product testing. Eventually, L’Oréal signed PETA’s Statement of Assurance, declaring an end to all animal testing in 1993.

 

Later, rumors led us to question whether L’Oréal had truly renounced animal testing of its ingredients. L’Oréal refused to clarify this issue for us, so we put a notation on our published list of companies that do not test on animals. Until the fall of 2000, no documentation had come to light that indicated that L’Oréal was conducting animal tests, so the company remained on our “don’t test” list (with a notation so that readers could make informed decisions).

 

In November, 2000, PETA was provided with evidence that L’Oréal had requested animal test data on at least one ingredient from a supplier. That same month, we were provided with statements from  L’Oréal that confirmed only that it does not test its finished products on animals. These statements included no mention of ingredient testing.

 

It also came to our attention that Naturewatch, an animal rights group in England, had started a L’Oréal campaign because of its possible testing of ingredients on animals. We faxed the company on two occasions regarding these documents and received no response.

 

So, while we have no definitive evidence that L’Oréal is testing its ingredients on animals, its silence—coupled with the information that we do have—leads us to believe that L’Oréal is probably not cruelty-free.

 

We have, therefore, moved L’Oréal from our “don’t test” list to our “do test” list.