Skip to Main Content
Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

Tellin’ It Like It is on Pet Stores

Wow. USA Today recently ran an awesome article exposing pet stores for what they are: corrupt, cold-hearted, unregulated, predatory businesses that sell sick animals from despicable puppy mills and unscrupulous breeders (as if there’s any other kind of breeder!).

And the author knows what she’s talking about—she’s a vet. She’s seen her fair share of pet store “widgets” with severe congenital defects and other ailments. In other words, if you have the time, patience, money, and space necessary to care for an animal, high-tail it away from the pet store and head to a reputable animal shelter.

Have your new pal spayed or neutered immediately if he or she hasn’t already been sterilized, and do everything you can to be the best guardian you can be. When you’ve mastered that, go out and help other animals in your community too.

Oh, and while you’re checking out the USA Today article, consider posting a comment telling the author how much she ROCKS!

Related Posts

Respond
Commenting is closed.
  • Heather Moore says:

    Hi Cici,

    Thanks for your comment. If you want to see what happens behind the scenes at pet stores, and in the facilities that supply them please visit HelpingAnimals.com and PetsmartCruelty.com.

    I know it’s easy to feel sorry for animals in pet stores, but if people buy them, the pet stores will profit and only have more of an incentive to keep peddling animals. If people don’t patronize pet stores, the owners will see that there is no demand for cruelty to animals, and will be more likely to sell only pet supplies.

    Living beings aren’t merchandise, but pet stores can still make a profit–and please people with animals–just by selling toys, bowls, food, treats, and other supplies.

    Thanks again for your comment and concern for animals!

    Heather

  • Cici says:

    ive been to quite a few pet stores and NONE of them did such a thing. all the animals, even the fish, were in clean, roomy environments and were not sick as stated above :(
    however, i adopted my 2 beautiful cats from the shelter only because shelter animals are in more urgent need of a good home because i dont believe in the unnecessary uthenization that takes the lives of so many potentially loving pets that havent had the chance to live that good life.
    but store animals need homes too! if they’re in such terrible conditions, someone should buy them and give them a comfortable life.

  • Mari says:

    thanks! saw this pop up on twitter and I am totally posting the original piece to my facebook. it’s good to know.

  • Christine says:

    I am a guardian for a lovely, friendly, loving, happy male (neutered, of course) springer spaniel whom we adopted from a shelter at age 5. He is now 6. Unfortunately, he suffers from alergies and skin irritations which I am certain are the results of poor breeding. We do our best to alleviate his discomfort through a good diet, soothing baths and some medications. Luckily his ailments are not serious and we should be able to continue to love him for several more years to come!

Connect With PETA

Submit