Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

Shareholder Campaign: Eli Lilly

Shareholder Campaign: Eli Lilly

Eli Lilly is the 10th largest pharmaceutical company in the world and markets a wide range of pharmaceuticals for human patients, the livestock industry, and companion animals.

2005 Resolution: ‘Give the Animals 5′

With the help of PETA supporters who held stock in Eli Lilly, a resolution was filed in the fall of 2004 calling on the company to “Give the Animals 5“—replace five crude and cruel animal tests with state-of-the-art and scientifically valid non-animal methods that were already in use in other countries.

Despite assurances that Eli Lilly only “uses animals in pre-clinical research to confirm the safety and efficacy of medicines when there are no alternatives,” the company opposed our resolution. PETA’s resolution was brought to a vote at Eli Lilly’s annual meeting and garnered approximately 9.2 million shares (1.2 percent).

2006 Resolution: Animal Welfare Policy

In 2006, PETA filed a resolution with Eli Lilly calling on the company to extend its animal welfare policy to include social and behavioral enrichment measures for the animals used both in-house and at contract testing laboratories. The resolution was largely the result of the horrors uncovered at the independent contract testing laboratory Covance Inc., which Lilly had retained to perform animal testing.

Eli Lilly published our resolution in its proxy materials along with its opposition statement advising shareholders to vote against it. Our resolution garnered 3.9 percent of the vote (more than 30 million shares), which qualified it to be reintroduced in 2007. 

2007 Resolutions: Animal Welfare Policy and Exporting Animal Experiments

In 2007, PETA re-filed the 2006 resolution and filed a second resolution calling on Eli Lilly to issue a report on the rationale of exporting experiments to countries with lax animal welfare laws, such as China, and to include details on the manner in which Eli Lilly extends its animal welfare policy to its foreign laboratories.

Eli Lilly published both our resolutions in its proxy materials along with its opposition statements advising shareholders to vote against them. PETA’s resolutions were brought to a vote at the company’s annual meeting. Our resolution on extending the company’s animal welfare policy garnered 3.9 percent of the vote, while our resolution on exporting animal research won 4.2 percent of the vote (approximately 29 million and 31 million shares, respectively).

2008 Resolution: Exporting Animal Experiments

In 2008, PETA filed a resolution calling on Eli Lilly to issue a report on the rationale of exporting experiments to countries with non-existent or lax animal welfare laws, such as China, and to include details on the manner in which Eli Lilly extends its animal welfare policy to its foreign laboratories. While Eli Lilly opposed our resolution, claiming such a report was an unnecessary use of company resources, PETA’s resolution was brought to a vote at the company’s annual meeting and garnered approximately 30 million shares (3.7 percent of the vote).

2012: Transparency in Animal Use

To promote transparency and minimize the use of animals, PETA filed a resolution in 2012 calling upon Eli Lilly to issue an annual report to shareholders disclosing the company’s procedures to ensure proper animal care at in-house and contract laboratories and its plans to promote alternatives to animal use. While Eli Lilly opposed our resolution, claiming that the company’s animal use and care policy that it posts on its website was sufficient, PETA’s resolution was brought to a vote at Eli Lilly’s annual meeting and garnered almost 40 million shares (4.9 percent of the vote).

Connect With PETA

Submit