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Shareholder Campaign: DuPont

DuPont is a large conglomerate operating in more than 90 countries with revenues of almost $39 billion in 2011. Its wide range of products includes agricultural, electronic, communication, home construction, transportation, and apparel goods. Most of the animal testing at DuPont is conducted by the company’s chemical division, either voluntarily or as part of government-required testing.

2005 Resolution: ‘Give the Animals 5′

With the help of a PETA supporter who held stock in DuPont, a resolution was filed in the fall of 2004, calling on the company to “Give the Animals 5“—replace five crude and cruel animal tests with state-of-the-art and scientifically valid non-animal methods that were already in use in other countries.

Despite its progressively worded “Animal Care and Use Policy,” DuPont opposed our resolution. PETA’s resolution was brought to a vote at the company’s annual meeting. Approximately 16 million shares (2.7 percent) were voted in favor of the resolution.

2006 Resolution: Animal Welfare Policy

In 2006, PETA filed a resolution with DuPont calling on the company to develop and make publicly accessible an animal welfare policy that would include reducing the numbers of animals used and implementing social and behavioral enrichment measures for the animals used both in-house and at contract testing laboratories.

The resolution was largely the result of the horrors uncovered in the independent contract testing laboratory Covance Inc., whose officials boasted that their clients have included “just about every major company around the world.”.

Subsequent discussions between DuPont and PETA’s regulatory testing divisions resulted in the company’s committing to taking steps to reduce the numbers of animals used in toxicity testing, including improving the conditions for the animals who continue to be used. In light of DuPont’s willingness to participate in a constructive and ongoing dialogue about these and other animal-testing issues, PETA voluntarily withdrew its resolution.

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