Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

PETA’s Investigations and Campaigns

Thoroughbred racehorse Coming Home, the granddaughter of Kentucky Derby winner Unbridled and the cousin of the doomed Derby entrant Eight Belles, was bought by a “meat buyer” at a livestock auction for $200 and was hours from being trucked to a slaughterhouse when a PETA investigator rescued her. Coming Home went to a real—and permanent—home on a PETA member’s farm, where she will never again have to fear for her life.

The derby is a dream for the nearly 30,000 horses born into the racing industry in the U.S. each year. A livestock auction and a bolt through the brain are the realities for castoff thoroughbred racehorses. Owners who pay exorbitant stud fees turn their backs on horses who are too old or injured to run or who are just not fast enough.

The following are just a few examples of PETA’s investigations and campaigns related to horse racing:

Please help us end the deadly cycle of breeding, breakdowns, and slaughter by asking The Jockey Club to implement the Thoroughbred 360 Life Cycle Fund. This plan would require owners and breeders to pay a $360 fee for new foal registrations, ownership transfers, and stallion or broodmare registrations and would generate more than $20 million every year toward the retirement of racehorses. Review PETA’s complete proposal to The Jockey Club and see details about PETA’s Thoroughbred 360 Life Cycle Fund here.

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