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Saints Player Sedrick Ellis Says, ‘Be Your Dog’s Biggest Defender’

NFL star Sedrick Ellis plays defensive tackle for the New Orleans Saints, but he knows the value of staying on the offense against potential disasters. So he encourages everyone to have a plan for how they’ll take care of their animals during an emergency. To make sure that all animals get the help they need, Sedrick appears alongside his dog Max in an ad that says, “Be your dog’s biggest defender”—especially during natural disasters.

New Orleans is vulnerable to hurricanes and flooding, as Sedrick reminds us in his public service announcement about caring for animals during emergencies. Watch the video now:

It was PETA’s Animal Emergency Fund that made it possible for PETA to rescue animals in the New Orleans area after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, and it helps PETA save animals’ lives by providing the media, government officials, and the public with vital information about protecting animals in advance of natural disasters. The fund also enables PETA to respond quickly when the worst occurs—whether that means offering rescuers and veterinary care or expert information on finding and aiding lost or injured animals.

Please join Sedrick Ellis in supporting PETA’s work for animals in crisis with a donation to our Animal Emergency Fund.Watch his message now, and learn how to be your companion animal’s biggest defender:

And don’t forget to follow these disaster-preparedness tips before disaster strikes:

  • Have an animal emergency kit readily available. The kit should include a harness and a leash or carrier, bottled water, food and water bowls, and dry and canned food. If you have a cat, keep litter and a small litter tray ready to go.
  • Make sure that all your animals wear collars or harnesses with identification. Keep a current photo of your animal companion for identification purposes, just as you would for a child.
  • Place an emergency window sticker near your front and back doors and on side windows in case a weather emergency or fire strikes when you are not home.
  • Know your destination ahead of time. Not all emergency shelters accept animals, but many hotels takes animals. Keep a list of hotels that always accept companion animals just in case (most Motel 6s accept animals), and be ready to cajole and beg hotels to make exceptions (most loosen “no pet” policies during disasters, thankfully).
  • Never turn animals loose outdoors—they can’t survive on “instinct.” Domesticated animals rely on human companions for many things and are totally helpless and vulnerable outdoors, especially in bad weather. Do not tie animals outdoors or keep them in a vehicle unattended. If you absolutely cannot take them with you, leave animals in a secure area inside your home with access to the upper floors (so that they can escape rising floodwaters).

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