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Lonely ‘Backyard Dogs’ Helped by PETA!

Every day, PETA helps dogs who are languishing alone  in backyards, longing for a friend and a chance to  stretch their legs and smell new scents. Sometimes these dogs don’t even have the basics, such as food  and shelter. We want all dogs to live indoors with  families who love them, but PETA works in areas where  many people are unfamiliar with the concept of allowing  dogs inside and where the law allows dogs to be  chained around the clock.

If we can’t convince the families we work with to allow  their pooches indoors—and if the dogs are not being  kept in illegal conditions—our fieldworkers and  volunteers do everything they can to improve the lives  of these lonely dogs and educate their guardians by  setting an example. A doghouse is no substitute for a  real home in which dogs sleep at their guardians’ feet,  but it makes a world of difference to the dogs who  previously had nowhere to escape from the scorching  sun or cold winds. Thanks to PETA, many formerly hopeless dogs have also been given toys, treats, desperately needed attention, affection, and respect for  their individuality.

Help support the PETA doghouse program by donating today!

Meet some of the dogs we’ve helped:

Blackie

Blackie was ankle-deep in mud and shivering from the cold when PETA staffers found her in a North Carolina backyard. They worked with her guardians to make her more comfortable. We gave this fluffy girl a sturdy doghouse and moved her to a grassy patch of land, where she was much happier—and drier!

Moyo

Handsome Moyo had only part of a rotting, dilapidated wooden fence for shelter before PETA delivered a custom-built doghouse stuffed with dry straw bedding for him to curl up in.

Miss Feisty

Miss Feisty rejoiced at bidding farewell to the overturned trash can that she had for shelter and moving into her sturdy PETA doghouse.

King

PETA’s Community Animal Project (CAP) straw delivery volunteers got a thank-you cuddle after moving King to a dry patch of land and giving him his very own PETA doghouse during a nasty winter storm.

Killer

The roof had fallen off Killer’s shelter, so his guardians haphazardly placed a mattress on top of the crumbling structure. PETA delivered a sturdy, safe, and warm doghouse to him along with a lightweight tie-out to replace his heavy metal chain.

Bear

Bear had only a pile of garbage to try to huddle under for shelter until we gave him a new doghouse. He was so happy about his new digs that he even smiled for the camera!

Rascal

Rascal was tangled up tightly in his chain and had only a crumbling stack of junk for shelter when CAP fieldworkers found him. After PETA gave him a new doghouse and a tangle-free, lightweight tie-out, Rascal sat pretty and was thrilled to have some room to move about.

Lucky

Lucky’s luck changed the day PETA’s fieldworkers found him. Now, instead of spending his days watching as life passes him by from within a filthy, ramshackle pen, he has a grassy area, a new doghouse, and a long lightweight tie-out. Lucky jumped for joy after finally being able to move around and feel the fresh grass beneath his feet.

Baby

Freed from the dangerously junk-filled makeshift pen that she was confined to 24 hours a day, seven days a week, Baby now has space to walk around, fresh grass to roll around in, and a cozy place to curl up in at night.

So how do they do it? Step into the shoes of a CAP volunteer:

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