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Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

Vivisectors: Saying ‘No’ Doesn’t Cut It

Written by PETA | May 10, 2010

Courthouse

PETA’s savvy legal team never stops uncovering new ways to expose the ugly business of vivisection. The Wall Street Journal, The Scientist, Nature Medicine, and an ABC News affiliate have all recently done pieces about our innovative approach to exposing the torment that animals are forced to endure in laboratories.

PETA has recently filed lawsuits against the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the University of Maryland–Baltimore for allegedly violating public records laws by withholding documents related to experiments in which holes are drilled into animals’ skulls and others in which animals are given electric shocks to their tongues when they take a sip of water. We’re also using a rarely invoked Wisconsin law to petition a judge to allow for prosecution of University of Wisconsin–Madison faculty members and administrators who have violated state law by subjecting sheep to painful and deadly decompression experiments.

The biggest fear for those who imprison, cut up, burn, shock, and poison animals for a living is exposure. We’ll continue to find and use every available legal avenue to make sure that laboratory doors are thrown wide open. Those responsible for harming animals must know that they are not above the law and that they will be held accountable in courtrooms—or at least in the court of public opinion. Please join our fight.

Written by Jennifer O’Connor

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  • Toby Saunders says:

    I agree that public ridicule of speciesist ethical sensibility is bound to have a postive impact on the practice of ethics. Lots of scientists use science emotionally as a way to relate to others I believe so if ‘the others’ are sufficiently dismissive of the research methods then scientists are more likely to see suffering as an intrinsic problem instead of such a culturallydetermined phenomenon. Science is awesome for the record. Denying rights is not!

  • elisabetta canalis says:

    i will fight bye u guy’s side

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