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Never Walk On By

Written by PETA | September 14, 2010
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pigeons in sky

 

While rushing to an early-morning tennis game, I spotted a pigeon in the middle of the sidewalk. I’ve lived in New York for years and rescued lots of birds in trouble, so I knew that this pigeon needed help because as I approached him, he stayed put. I was easily able to scoop him up. I always keep a “ready kit”—a carrier filled with supplies—in my apartment, so I used it to rush this poor bird to the wonderful folks at the Wild Bird Fund. They found that he was suffering without hope, so they gave him a painless release from the virus that was ravaging his body.

Please never walk by an injured or sick animal or assume that someone else will come to the rescue. Often, no one does. Be prepared for your own wildlife emergency, and become an angel for animals! No errand, deadline, appointment, tennis game—not even a job interview—is as important as helping an animal in trouble.

If you find a sick or injured animal and are unsure what to do, please call PETA immediately. Caseworkers are on call 24 hours day, and they are here to help.

Written by Jannette Patterson

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  • Kathleen Smith says:

    I work as a driving instructor in England. Several times now Ive stopped sometimes on a lesson to pick up an injured animal or bird and taken it to the nearest vet. A vet is legally obliged to treat any wild animal up to the size of a swan in the UK. I dont know if its the same for you guys across the pond!! Sometimes unfortunately all they can do is to put it out of its misery but at least that means the poor thing isnt suffering any more. If this does happen on a lesson I always add more time on the end so that my pupil doesnt lose out and hopefully they take on board the lesson on compassion as well as driving!!

  • Dean Ween says:

    This is so important. No one would drive past an apparent human being in the middle of the road or on the shoulder and not bother to take a second to make sure she was no longer suffering I’d hope. We should extend the same mercy to animals. I tap eyeballs in all animals I pass on roads. Anyone who blinks back I rush to the vet for a painless release. Those we pass may die so so slowly over hours.

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