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Mepkin Monks to Shut Down Egg Factory Farm

Written by PETA | February 4, 2012

Update: Great news! The monks at Mepkin Abbey now have a thriving mushroom business. After PETA’s protests, boycotts, and complaints to government agencies, the monks re-examined their egg farm and discovered that they can get all their needs met without harming animals.

The following was originally posted on December 20, 2007:

We’ve just heard the news that the monks at Mepkin Abbey have decided to phase out their egg-production business over the next year and a half following pressure from PETA, including protests of the monastery that are going on today. According to the Associated Press, Mepkin’s Father Stan Gumula said late last night that the focus on the monks’ practices as a result of PETA’s investigation has been too much of a distraction, and that they will be looking for a new industry to help meet their expenses.

PETA Vice President Bruce Friedrich points out that South Carolina had the 6th highest peanut production among U.S. states last year (quite how he knows such things, I have no idea), and recommends that the monks go into the booming business of peanut butter packaging, where they can pack the peanuts as tight as they like without any fear of our getting on their case about it. In fact, we might be their first customers. My own vote is more traditional—there’s nothing quite like a good Trappist Ale.

Whatever they end up deciding, this is nothing short of a Christmas miracle for the chickens who have suffered for so long at Mepkin Abbey, and we commend the monks for their compassionate decision.

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  • Christine Kapetanios says:

    Those who preach their devout loyalty to God should know that love and compassion towards all living things is one of the highest moral to livey by. Monks should know better than to profit through cruelty. So too, should those who preach their love for God yet support inhumane practices against God’s creatures. Harms is the way of the human plague. Compassion the way of God. Wake up or remain the plague.

  • Trish says:

    Isn’t it amazing that the same people who are glad that the hens aren’t being abused will come on here and abuse fellow humans? I support PETA but I do not support abusing, trashing and talking down to people who have differing beliefs than myself. Namaste everyone:)

  • polly sueiro says:

    What we need to do that of course NO ONE would EVER agree to is to round up as many of you ‘…those animals aren’t treated unfairly…’ and ‘…I like eggs! Make more!’ people and crate you up indefinitely eating sleeping and defecating in the same tiny space until you acknowlege what a horrible existence it is and scream ‘MERCY!’ Then you would be SUPER fortunatebecause you would be let out of hell… THEN and only then your posts may have some meaning…

  • joshua ernest davis says:

    i agree with holly hite

  • Glenn Charest says:

    Have been familiar with PETA’s allegations against the monks at Mepkin however I just noticed on of the reports which says that the chickens at Mepkin never see the light of day nor do they get any fresh air. I have been to Mepkin and specifically to the henlaying houses and unless all of my sensory faculties shut down while there there was sunlight aplenty and an abundance of fresh…albeit humid summer South Carolina fresh air. Not quite sure why someone from PETA would go to such lengths to misrepresent the conditions of the chickens while at the same time publically accusing the “leaders” of the abbey of lying about the care given the birds. When the truth is embellished by a lack of veracity the truth itself and the one who posits the truth both lose credibility. PETA should have stuck with the truth about the condition of the cages as well as the injured animals and maybe then their credibility would remain less suspect.

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