Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

Hunting Dog Left for Dead in a Ditch

Written by PETA | December 27, 2011

While heading out to pick up and transport animals belonging to low-income residents for spay-and-neuter surgeries at one of PETA’s mobile clinics, a PETA Community Animal Project fieldworker spotted a truck driver attempting to drag something out of a ditch on the side of a busy highway. Our staffer pulled over to make sure that the “something” was not an animal, but to her horror, it was just that—a horribly injured hound dog who was soaking wet, shivering, covered with lacerations, and unable to stand or walk.

The tracking collar around the dog’s neck helped explain how he had wound up wandering along a highway: He had been used for hunting. Hunters rarely treat their dogs any better than the animals they take pleasure in killing. Countless hunting dogs are hit by cars when they cross highways while tracking prey or when they become lost during hunts. Dogs are frequently (and illegally) abandoned at the end of the season or when the dog “won’t hunt.” Many hounds spend most of their lives chained up or confined to pens in all weather extremes, and they are often trained with shock collars, which can cause burns and cardiac fibrillation and turn dogs into confused, fearful, nervous wrecks.

As for this poor, suffering hound, PETA’s fieldworker gently loaded him into her van and quickly rushed him to an animal shelter. The dog was taken to a veterinary clinic right away, where it was determined that he had suffered a broken back and that euthanasia was the most humane option for him.

Hunting hurts not only the animals targeted by this cruel blood sport but also the dogs hunters use as their unwitting pawns. It’s time to stop hunting for trouble.

Related Posts

Respond

Comments

Post a Comment

If your comment doesn't appear right away, please be patient as it may take some time to publish or may require moderation.

By submitting this form, you are agreeing to our collection, storage, use, and disclosure of your personal info in accordance with our privacy policy as well as to receiving e-mails from us.

  • Cking says:

    I promise you a hunting dog is a lot less likely to be abused than one adopted by the pound. Y’all are such hypocrites. I treat my hounds better than I treat myself. You find an extreme case and try to pass it off as the norm. I hunt bobcats and mountain lions with hounds and a lot of good predator control comes from it. I feel sorry for the dog but I’m not gonna sit and listen to u guys try and say this is the standard situation for a hunting dog. On top of that a trained bobcat hound is worth four to eight thousand dollars. So why would a hunter mistreat it. The other way around I’s more like it, y’all should be ashamed

  • Haley says:

    First off I would like to say that this is horrible. And no animal deserves to be treated like this. Secondly, I would like to say that I am a hunter. I will agree that probably 95% of ‘hunters’ treat their animals like this; But I don’t consider them hunters. Real houndsmen or women would never treat an animal like this. It’s such a shame, because hunters who have done this to their dog give hunters like myself a bad name. My dogs are my world, and I treat them like nothing less. They’re always at the vet for routine check up’s, they’re always up to date on vaccines and I don’t ever ‘starve them to make them hunt’. That’s ridiculous. All three of my current hunting dogs came from abusive homes. One was so bad that she didn’t even have any hair, and was 15lbs underweight with worms, scars, and a missing piece of her ear. But today, you’d never be able to tell. People who don’t know me think she’s a pet, based on her looks and the way I treat her. On brutal cold nights or during storms, my dogs are brought inside. I don’t breed them like crazy; If a dog is suitable to breed, I think she should only be bred once or maybe twice through out her lifetime, but never back to back. I also don’t believe that a dog should be killed or tossed over an animal shelters fence if it won’t hunt. There are so many little kids who’d love a hound dog as a pet, or even older people. You can’t just throw them away like that; they’re animals, not people. And about killing innocent animals, there’s still some hunters out there who have morals and standards. I speak only for myself on this, but I hardly ever kill an animal. If there are wild boars on someones farm that’s killing their cattle (yes, that’s possible) or ruining their fields, I’ll use the dogs to catch them, but we re-locate them most of the time. If it’s sick or something is wrong with it, we’ll kill it. Simply because it would either suffer or spread the sickness. We’ll kill one hog about every two years to eat. As far as bear, we rarely kill them. I’d just as soon tree the animal, and then lead my dogs off the tree. I don’t get satisfaction out of killing the animal; I don’t run off of a power trip. I also won’t kill a bear (or hog) that has babies, is young, or that’s under a certain weight. I believe in ethical hunting. Not killing everything you find just to kill it. The same as Shepherds were bred for herding, Great Danes were bred for guarding, hounds were bred for hunting. But back 200 years ago, people were ethical about their hunting. They didn’t drink beer and run their dogs to death. And more people need to bring back ethical hunting, not sport hunting. It’s a sad thing when people feel that they have to kill and destroy animals just to feel superior about themselves.

  • Eric says:

    I’d say the owner must of liked the dog enough to put a 130 dollar tracking collar on the dog.

  • Bridget says:

    The world would be a better place without any hunters in it.

  • chary says:

    Hunters are truly horrible and distusting people, should be ashamed of themselves!!

  • Barbara says:

    My husband has hunting odds and they are treated vervwell! Seemsvthe most cruel going that they wil literally run themselves to death don pinning Thames is rhe only lption’ that have good home unto Il they die it is away of jive for him abiftuion is so much worse!

  • 4theluvofanimals says:

    This is such a sad story, my heart goes out to this poor dog left to die. Hunters are so irresponsible and uncaring for the animals they use for their evil ‘entertainment’. I have a rescued Saluki cross who was used as a hare coursing dog only to be abandoned when she got pregnant. Luckily she was found and went to a dogs shelter to have her puppies which were all adopted. She was just skin and bone and full of worms but she is the most gentle and precious dog you could ever wish to meet and I love her to pieces.

  • Amanda says:

    Thank God someone stopped! This poor thing. So glad that the suffering ended. Sometimes, I am SO saddened by humanity.

  • Lisa says:

    Poor poor dog breaks your heart lookig at the photo of him totally defenseless unable to move, thank god the truck driver noticed him and tried to help just when the mobile clinic was passing because if that hadnt happened god knows how long that dog would of been left there, i doubt very much the hunters would of bothered to look for him, they are just like greyhound racers, if the dog isnt up to the job gets injured or too old they get rid. Very sad this poor dog could not be saved but lovely that there are people that care and try to help.

  • Tornike says:

    I guess PETA needs the Facebook ‘Recommend’ plugin instead of ‘Like’ on articles. I wouldn’t click the latter on such horrific piece.

  • Sophia says:

    This breaks my heart… How can anyone be so cruel and so heartless? No animal deserves to be put in this situation.. EVER! Bless his heart, and hope that dog rests in peace now.

  • SHARI PEARSON says:

    I have seen alot of cruelty pictures but this one REALLY broke my heart! Thank God at least his dogs last moments on earth was with a loving human being that show love towards him ( the dog) and was humanly put down to release him of his pain. Hunting Kills… And it killed this dog. Look at it’s little face,’that poor little face..wondering why his “‘owner”‘left him. I hope PETA’ issues out a REWARD’ for any information leading to the arrest of whoever left this beautiful dog to die. Keep us posted.

  • iamaprotector says:

    Breaks my heart to read this :-( How could this happen! to this little darling and to all the little darlings :-( REST IN PEACE SWEETNESS

  • Victoria C says:

    It is the same with many hunt dogs in England they have them shot or worse after they can’t hunt any more or keep up to a fast pace. Government is trying to bring back hunting with dogs through a bill to repeal the hunting ban even though the majority of the public don’t want it.

  • Virginia_NY says:

    So disgusting and barbaric. They’ll hunt and kill innocent animals, and abuse and leave their hunting dog dog in a ditch, with a broken back.

  • Sophie Wheeler says:

    That’s just terrible to hear! What kind of person would be so heartless as to do something like that!

  • LuvMy Dog says:

    My husband and I adopted a Lemon Walker Hound a year and a Half ago from a Shelter. She was in the same situation… Abandoned, because she was too small to hunt, abused, starving. When we saw her in the shleter, My heart broke and we had to take her. Now she is thriving, loving and the sweetest thing you will ever meet. She also is finally coming around to people. I also learned that HUNT CLUBS have mass amouunts of dogs that they spray paint numbers on and then turn them loose if they wont hunt… Sooo Sad.

Connect With PETA

Subscribe