Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

He’s a Real Prince

Written by PETA | June 23, 2010
© Star Max Inc.
Prince

Well, he’s not a real prince, but animals might disagree! While we’re sure that nothing can top winning PETA’s coveted Sexiest Vegetarian Alive title (which he nabbed in 2006), pop royalty Prince is set to add yet another statuette to his mantelpiece: a lifetime achievement award from BET.

In our opinion, Prince deserves a lifetime achievement award based on his empathy for animals alone. Refusing to eat “anything with parents,” this cover boy for compassion recently served a sumptuous four-course vegan dinner to Ebony magazine staffers who were visiting his home to do a cover story on him.

He also refuses to wear animals—and he’s not shy about it. In the liner notes to his 1999 CD Rave Un2 the Joy Fantastic, Prince explained why the jacket he’s wearing in one of the album-cover photos is faux wool:

“If this jacket were real wool, it would have taken 7 lambs whose lives would have begun like this … Within weeks of their birth, their ears would have been hole-punched, their tails chopped off and the males would have been castrated while fully conscious. Xtremely high rates of mortality r considered normal: 20 2 40% of lambs die b4 the age of 8 weeks: 8 million mature sheep die every year from disease, xposure or neglect. Many people believe shearing helps animals who would otherwise b 2 hot. But in order 2 avoid losing any wool, ranchers shear sheep b4 they would naturally shed their winter coats, resulting in millions of sheep deaths from xposure 2 the cold.”

Years later, when a fan tried to give Prince a leather coat during a concert in Washington, D.C., he demurred, “Please do not kill a cow so I can wear a coat!”

Prince also once famously declared: “We need an Animal Rights Day when all slaughterhouses shut down.” His response to people who ask why he worries about animals in the face of widespread human suffering? “Compassion is an action word with no boundaries.”

Prince, congratulations on your richly deserved award.

Written by Alisa Mullins

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  • La La says:

    He sounds like a pretty cool guy although I few things struck me as off from his quote. First, the tail docking of lambs is done purely for medical reasons. Without tail docking, most sheep breeds develop anal infections within the first year or so of life. Sheep are very delicate creatures and often symptoms do not show up until a few hours before death, far too late for any treatment. The other solution to this would perhaps be to selectively breed sheep for much smaller (and less wooly) tails. However, that presents its own plethora of problems, from inbreeding to linked traits, the list extends. Additionally, I would be interested to know if Prince has ever personally castrated (or “wethered”) a ram lamb himself. The farmers I know all use a method of rubber banding. The immensely strong rubber band cuts of circulation, numbing the area quite quickly. The rubber band is left on for as long as three weeks, allowing time to be sure no feeling will remain when the genitalia is removed. Also, most lambs are not particularly bothered by the addition of the rubber band, often taking a few seconds for a “wait, what?” moment of looking and sniffing, before returning to the everyday flow of life (eating, playing with siblings, climbing all over mama, etc.). To me, these do not seem like the symptoms of extreme pain or perturbation, but maybe that’s just me. Now, you may be asking, “okay… but why are you wethering them in the first place?” (remember, to wether is to castrate in the world of the baa-ing creatures.) Farmers wether ram lambs primarily to prevent inbreeding and dueling. These lambs are going to be put in the same pasture as the remainder of the flock, that includes their mamas and sisters. When they grow up they would then breed with these close relations, a practice which comes with a million and one health problems. Additionally, rams fight each other, often to the death. But a ram will not view a wether as competition, so duels are prevented. For most farmers, the only option to slaughtering all their ram lambs is castration. I’m not trying to convert anyone, I am simply attempting to educate. I find too often that people become vegetarian or vegan without knowing all the facts. It’s better for everyone if you know all there is to know about your cause, that way you can not only make an informed decision, but also back up that decision to anyone who asks or argues. To achieve this, I highly recommend visiting a large variety of farms, big and small, organic and not, you’ll learn a ton and grow in your resolution.

  • angela tolley says:

    aw dudeI love Prince.Purple rain is one of my favorite songs.I loved him even before I knew him to be veg..or myself became veg as far as that goes

  • miguelmendezmills says:

    I wishes says something special you allwith the “ELECTRONIC WATER”this animal suffer already finish…. God Bless you all. Miguel Mendez Mills

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