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Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.

Elementary School Launches ‘Change for Chained Dogs’

Written by PETA | December 21, 2009

Every year, PETA’s offices are flooded with calls about dogs who are relegated to the backyard by guardians who refuse to let them inside. These dogs are left outside in freezing temperatures, often with nothing more than a plastic barrel or a wooden lean-to as shelter from the ice, sleet, and snow. For the last two years, a third-grade class at Samuel Staples Elementary School in Easton, Connecticut, has worked hard to raise funds for PETA’s doghouse program, which provides warm homes for lonely backyard dogs. The students donate their leftover lunch money, parts of their allowance—even the quarters that they find in couch cushions. With all their combined change, the students were able to raise more than $800 for dogs last year!

 

Ace

 

It was such a great idea that TeachKind—PETA’s humane-education program, which I coordinate—is launching a brand-new school fundraising program called Change for Chained Dogs.

This program makes it easy for schools to get students active and empower them to make a difference for animals. Every school that signs up gets an introductory letter, stickers, leaflets, and a sign to print out and tape to collection cans. So far, more than 500 schools—including Samuel Staples—have signed up for the fundraiser. It’s a great opportunity for students, families, and communities to work together to help dogs in need.

We hope that even more schools will get involved in this exciting program, so if you have kids or know any educators, encourage them to sign up their school to host a Change for Chained Dogs fundraiser! And if you want to make a contribution yourself but don’t know any kids, don’t worry—you can always donate directly to PETA’s doghouse program to help give lonely dogs a warm home this winter.

Written by Liz Graffeo

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  • Ricky says:

    I’m so glad to hear that elementary school children care so much about the plight of chained dogs!

  • Aaron says:

    hey dog lovers i just got done watching a show called Predator Quest where they kill coyoties one after another.When i say one after another i mean a guy lures one in with a whistle thing that sounds like a crying baby and shoot one running right toward him.Without getting up he puts his gun on the ground grabs his whistle to lure another and I swear to you in less then or about a minute here comes another to be shot down.people this isnt sport its murder.Im not a peta personi eat meat but what i witnessed was so wrong I wrote them and now I make it a point for this to be stopped.The guy goes alright i got a tripleWOW! I saidif this is right by law Micheal Vick should have every penny put back in his account.

  • Kelley says:

    Children already know what is right and what is wrong. We need to encourage them to learn to act on their beliefs at an early age. This will lead to a generation of compassionate citizens!

  • Toni says:

    If there is a chained dog dying or suffering near you and animal control and the authorities won’t do anything to save that dog take pictures and video and go online! Let the world know about that dog’s suffering! Exposure is the only way to get this cruelty dealt with in some cases.

  • Julie Ann Zserdin says:

    how cool. what a great idea and good job kids kids are so cool. they are so open to new ideas and are normally very compassionate and great to teach how to live compassionate lives and how to treat animals lovingly and with respect and compassion.

  • Brien Comerford says:

    It’s imperative to instill a sentiment of respect for all life in children at an early age.